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This question already has an answer here:

Non-rotating big stars can be subject to a gravitational collapse increasing their density. When the density is so high that the mass volume shrinks below the event horizon, a black hole is formed.

Is such an "initial" black hole already considered as a singularity, or are there further shrinking processes required in order to consider the black hole to be a singularity? Do the characteristic dynamics of black holes include further shrinking processes until the mass is reduced to a point (or nearly)?

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marked as duplicate by ACuriousMind, Community Jan 10 '16 at 14:54

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  • $\begingroup$ It's a function of the speed of collapse versus the size of the BH. the initial BH is genuine BH that would evaporate in a nanosecond, and it is constantly being filled with a barrage of matter which crosses the event horizon, which makes the BH durable and more considerable in our view than a small one. All BH's are theoretically the same during their formation excepting theories of non rotating ones... the question you ask is a function of the theoretical extent of the singularity being infinitely small versus the theorized point at which the matter stops falling, both unresolved concepts. $\endgroup$ – com.prehensible Jan 10 '16 at 11:27
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    $\begingroup$ Are you asking about the true singularity at $r=0$, the coordinate singularity at the event horizon or both? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jan 10 '16 at 11:29
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A singularity is defined as a point of infinite density and they are believed to reside at the center of a black hole .

The "when does the singularity form" question, is answered concisely here.

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  • $\begingroup$ Jeremy's answer would mean, that there is some physical process transforming the star which has shrunken beyond the event horizon into a single point "in about a millisecond" (from the point of view of the collapsing star). I would like to know if this is just one minor theory among others or if it is really the prevailing theory, and if there is some model for such an incredible process transforming matter into a point singularity. $\endgroup$ – Moonraker Jan 10 '16 at 12:09

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