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This is a reasonably common question however most threads seemed to be focused on introduction to the subject only.

I am looking for a textbook in quantum mechanics/physics so that I can revise before starting my PhD. I have Quantum Mechanics by Mandl and have read the Griffiths textbook which seems to get good praise but I don't feel convinced by it.

A book that goes from elementary quantum mechanics to masters level would be ideal. I understand this is something subjective but any thoughts would be appreciated.

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    $\begingroup$ IMO, use whatever the grad course offered at your program uses. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Jan 8 '16 at 2:45
  • $\begingroup$ Wouldn't a better home for this be chat? It's a fact that this isn't a conceptual physics question and this (the main site) is not a physics forum. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Jan 8 '16 at 3:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Alfred Centauri: Probably opinion-based also. $\endgroup$ – user36790 Jan 8 '16 at 3:46
  • $\begingroup$ You have an entire physics library at your school... go in and take a look at the quantum physics section. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jan 8 '16 at 3:55
  • $\begingroup$ @CuriousOne the library! Of course! Why did I not see that before...obviously I have looked at many books, I was looking for a concensus. Not a statement in the obvious. $\endgroup$ – Q.P. Jan 10 '16 at 3:31
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R. Shankar's book is a really good transitory book between Griffiths and Sakurai (commonly used in grad. schools) as it begins by building up a solid linear algebra foundation, doesn't shy away from Dirac notation (something that Griffiths annoyingly does), and begins to delve into the group theoretical aspects of the subject. If you feel comfortable enough with Shankar, then I'd suggest you go straight to Sakurai. I'd also recommend picking up Dirac's book, both because it ensures that you understand the foundations well and also for its poetry.

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Zettili is good with a lot of worked examples. And can be a starting point.

Bransden & Joachain could be something you want to look at

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