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I can not really understand why two bodies attract each other, what happens between? One points out the gravitational field to explain this phenomenon and one say that it is because of the general relativity. I am aware that these both are just models and that this is how humans do when it comes explaining phenomena. However, I'd like to ask that which model is more real? Are there any experimental conclusion on what happens between two bodies (e.g., between Sun & Earth)?

Sorry, if the question is silly.

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    $\begingroup$ How would you distinguish a perfectly working model from the "real" thing? $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Jan 7 '16 at 22:56
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    $\begingroup$ Does "working" mean "in accordance with experiments"? $\endgroup$ – frosh Jan 7 '16 at 22:57
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    $\begingroup$ General relativity indeed uses a form of a field model, so I'm not sure what other model you're referring to. $\endgroup$ – HDE 226868 Jan 7 '16 at 23:04
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    $\begingroup$ Scientific "understanding" is about how nature works, not "why" it works. You can't start physics by philosophising about "the nature of the stone". But if you pick up a few and you notice the difference in weight and that you can throw the smaller ones further than the big ones and you take that seriously in itself, then you will, eventually, arrive at Newtonian mechanics. You are basically stuck in the role of Plato, right now. Are you going to keep looking at the shadows in detail or are you going to pretend that they don't matter? Chose wisely. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jan 8 '16 at 0:27
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    $\begingroup$ In a sense it is silly. There are no cog wheels in there and even if there were cog wheels you don't actually understand why cogwheels work. After all, they work because they are solid, but you don't understand that: you simply experience it and accept it. A working model is what understanding is, and everything you understand is something that you have a working model for. $\endgroup$ – dmckee --- ex-moderator kitten Jan 8 '16 at 1:40

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