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I have been extremely curious on how to get water even hotter by couple more degrees when its boiling.

Rather then adding salt .... I started to stirring it..

Same Concept works with cooling the water in metal pan. You are forcing the water on sides of the pan.

so now I'm wondering if the same concept can be using when using it for steam powered energy.

Add more steam. Rather then increasing the fire Just simply start the rotator with blades inside water boiling. Not sure.

Can someone help and do couple test? See what the results are. Very Curious.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hello, and welcome to Stack Exchange. This won't work; at best it will only dissipate heat faster. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Griscom Jan 1 '16 at 2:01
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The boiling point of water does increase if you dissolve a non-volatile solute like salt into it.

But mechanical agitation like stirring has no effect on boiling point whatsoever. You should check that with a good quality, calibrated thermometer and see it for yourself.

Likewise, adding steam will heat cold water to its boiling point but once reached that boiling point is not affected by further steam addition or mechanical agitation.

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The usual way to increase the temperature of boiling water is to increase the pressure - this is the principle of the pressure cooker which is a strong closed vessel with just a small weight over an aperture: the weight will be lifted once the pressure reaches a sufficient value, and this prevents the vessel from exploding. Such a device is used to speed up cooking times (especially at higher altitudes where the boiling point of water is significantly below 100 °C).

From wikipedia a plot of the temperature in a pressure cooker (qualitative):

enter image description here

And a curve of the vapor pressure of water at different temperatures (flip that around and you have the boiling point at different pressures) source: wikipedia:

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ 10+ for thoroughness, well deserved. $\endgroup$ – Gert Jan 1 '16 at 2:46

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