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I was wondering if there exists a list with all (or most of) the High-$T_c$ superconductor materials. In particular I'd like to know if there are databases or review that classifies them by their electronic/doping structure or some other different classification method. Up to know, I only found some short list with temperature based classification.

Does exist something like the Mendeleev's table for superconductors?

How many of these material have been discovered so far? (the order of magnitude would be good enough)

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    $\begingroup$ Somebody may have collected a bibliography on papers with relevant research, but that wouldn't be a useful database. I used to work at a place which did research on High-$T_c$ superconductivity in the early days. Their samples were prepared by a very skillful visiting scientist from Russia, I believe. After he was gone they couldn't replicate even one of the materials he made for them. The oxygen contents, which , if I remember correctly, depended very strongly on the sintering process parameters, were all different. Some materials are simply very hard to reproduce from descriptions. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Dec 23 '15 at 1:10
  • $\begingroup$ @CuriousOne This is very interesting! Nowadays, there are so many groups working on this topic that a systematization should have already be done. Otherwise, the database will be a very useful tool. Apart from sintering process parameters, how many HTC-materials are there (order of magnitude)? $\endgroup$ – DDd Dec 23 '15 at 8:51
  • $\begingroup$ I haven't been following the field for decades, so I can't tell how many hundred or thousand classes of high-$T_C$ exist, already. I remember that it felt like it was on the order of dozens within a few years of the initial discovery. This wasn't meant to give an answer, anyway, just a warning that a physics paper is not a sufficient cookbook recipe for material sciences. (Organic?) chemistry seems to be a little better in that regard, but the physical preparation of materials is a fickle discipline that seems to require patience, experience and sheer endless stamina. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Dec 23 '15 at 9:22
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    $\begingroup$ I don't know any database, that you want but maybe this book was useful: amazon.com/… here, you can find classification of cuprate superconductors with crystal structure. at least, it is a good overview book about superconductivity :) $\endgroup$ – pan91 Dec 26 '15 at 20:52
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In the summer I was looking for a kind of list like you are searching for. The previous commenters mentioned the hard to repeat nature of these papers. I give you links which were pretty useful for me, but keep in mind that the exact crystalline structure, the exact proportion of elements, pressure and many oter parameters can have large effects on the superconductivity. At first, some wikipedia links, which I found useful: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron-based_superconductor ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuprate_superconductor ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:High-temperature_superconductors ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallic_hydrogen ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_diboride ; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrogen_sulfide . This link has a pretty good table in it with $T_{c}$ crystal structure and lattice constants: https://aqpl.mc2.chalmers.se/~delsing/Superconductivity/Lectures_files/HTS%202016%20Lecture%201.pdf As I know the order of magnitude of the number of discovered High-$T_{c}$ superconductors is in hundreds but not thousands.I hope my answer is going to be useful. :)

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