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I have a cylindrical material with a hole going through its center all along the larger dimension (length). I know the dimensions and the volume of the cylinder at temperature T1. Now, if I heat it up to another temperature T2, then I can calculate the volume change from the volume expansion coefficient of the material, which I already know. But, how to calculate the new dimensions (diameter, length) of the cylinder at that elevated temperature? I mean, how the diameter and length change would relate to the volume change? Any help will be highly appreciated ...

Thanks Naz

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Every dimension of the cylinder will increase by the same proportion - let's call it x. Then the volume increases by a factor of $(1+x)^3.$ You know the latter, so just take the cube root.

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