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As you increase the energy of a photon it's wavelength shortens. Is it theoretically posible for light to not have a wavelength? Like a still pond?

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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps you could say that a motionless magnet or point charge gives off light of zero wavelength. Then again, perhaps not. $\endgroup$ – Daniel Griscom Nov 29 '15 at 9:03
  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicates: physics.stackexchange.com/q/16391/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic May 8 '17 at 20:10
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The relationship between energy and wavelength:

$$E = h f = \frac{h c}{\lambda}$$

As $\lambda$ goes to zero, $E$ goes to infinity.

So "no".

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In case of photon's wave nature they have definite wavelengths for definite energies. If wavelength become zero then its energy become infinite which is impossible. Secondly, every wave must have wavelength which defines its motion. If wavelength become zero then wave become motionless.

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  • $\begingroup$ I guess you cannot argue with the maths but it does seem odd to me that the lowest energy state of light would require infinite energies. Seems like it's upside-down $\endgroup$ – Justin Nov 30 '15 at 18:15
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How about doing it the other way? Quote "The earth is a magnet, and it is accelerating as it rotates the Sun, so it radiates EM waves with a period of 365 days and a wavelength of 1 light year." The frequency would be so low as to have no detectable wavelength. Like a still pond.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome on Physics SE :) I think it would be nice if you could elaborate on your answer a bit - as of now, it is hard to really tell what you might be thinking about. $\endgroup$ – Sanya May 8 '17 at 21:01

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