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This may sound like a dumb question.

Is there anyway to create a miniature version of earth or its gravitational force.

A globe or sphere which have force inside it which can attract the things laying on its surface. My main question is about water.

What kind of force is that even if the sphere is inverted the water don't fall down ?

is there anyway possible to create something like that ?

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  • $\begingroup$ i was not asking about creating another earth :-) but a small globe . as you mentioned even if we try to create a sphere and objects with mass proportionality . Its impossible? So is gravity a kind of force which we cannot simulate by our science ? my dumbness to the peak :-) $\endgroup$
    – zod
    Nov 24, 2015 at 21:47
  • $\begingroup$ any matter produces a gravitational force, the problem is that this force is weak and proportional to the mass. Thus a small sphere has gravity but it will be much weaker than that from earth, so the water will fall to earth because it feels a stronger push from it. $\endgroup$
    – user83548
    Nov 24, 2015 at 21:53
  • $\begingroup$ The gravity you can make with feasible materials and size is far, far weaker than the Earth's gravity. Even if you somehow get away from Earth, you'll also be dealing with surface tension. The final answer, I'm afraid, is "no". $\endgroup$ Nov 24, 2015 at 22:01
  • $\begingroup$ I remember long back my physics teacher told us to believe in something , then build science on top of that . I am going to tell the same thing to my 5 year old son $\endgroup$
    – zod
    Nov 24, 2015 at 22:09

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you could do that by replacing gravity (that is ultra-weak) by another similar force (i.e. attraction in $\frac 1 {d^2}$ ), like electrostatic. It's easy to act on small charged objects. (but if you want a liquid to be attracted, it's more difficult :-) )

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