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If you have two hydrogen atoms. And they are the isotope form "Protium" (1 neutron removed) and they are also cationized +1 (1 electron removed) then you have (in a sense) a single proton (two of them actually).


1) Are these protons just subatomic particles now (i.e. protons)? Or are they still "Atoms" consisting of only a proton?

2) If you were to bond them, would you have a weird cationized isotope form of H2 or would you have a weird cationized isotope form of He


I would imagine the bond has the 2 protons close to each other, but they are not close enough to have a "strong nuclear force" and thefore are just bonded, not fused, and are technically H2 and only become He when they get close enough to be classified as a Nucleus?

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  • $\begingroup$ He$^{^2}$ is not stable - it very rapidly decays to two protons. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Nov 21 '15 at 22:45
  • $\begingroup$ "and thefore are just bonded, not fused, and are technically $\mathrm{H_2}$" does not correspond to any physical reality. W/o at least one electron no bonding MO can be formed. 2 protons are fused into $\mathrm{He^2}$ or they remain just that: 2 protons... $\endgroup$ – Gert Nov 21 '15 at 23:39
  • $\begingroup$ @Gert so if you had two protiums bonded into H2 isotope (with electrons) and then you cationized it, it would just become 2 protons? $\endgroup$ – Albert Renshaw Nov 22 '15 at 1:09
  • $\begingroup$ @AlbertRenshaw: I think you're confusing isotopes and molecules. $\mathrm{He^{2}}$ is an (unstable) isotope, obtained by fusion of 2 protons. $\mathrm{H_2}$ is a molecule of diprotium, obtained by chemical reaction between 2 protium atoms. $\endgroup$ – Gert Nov 22 '15 at 1:21

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