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In nuclear reactions, the difference between the binding energy of the reactants and that of the products is converted to the thermal energy of the products.

Is the Coulomb force that actually gives kinetic energy to the product particles both in the nuclear fission and in the nuclear fusion?

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The kinetic energies of the fragments of a nuclear interaction are determined by conservation of energy and momentum, not by any particular "pushing force." The energy of a nuclear system is a function of all of the fundamental forces, but most the strong force.

For example, fission neutrons are emitted by evaporation from excited fission fragments, with typical energies of order 2 MeV. Neutrons do not feel the electrostatic Coulomb force, since neutrons have no charge.

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For the fission fragments - yes, it is the Coulomb force that accelerates them, right after the scission they are at rest. Nucleons and light fragments emitted from a nuclei have an initial velocity, the Coulomb force for them is smaller (or even zero for neutrons). One can assume that they are already in motion incident the nucleus and get additional momentum from the projectile.

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