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Does anyone know the reference where Gustav Kirchhoff published his famous circuit laws?

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  • $\begingroup$ Not sure that he actually formulated them in a way that is easy to find in his papers. Here is a link to one that contains a reprint of one of his original papers: ifi.unicamp.br/~assis/Apeiron-V19-p19-25%281994%29.pdf. Some of what he talks about in there may be a complicated way of expressing his laws. There may, of course, be another paper that is much more directly addressing the laws. $\endgroup$
    – CuriousOne
    Oct 31, 2015 at 20:14

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The second paragraph from this IEEE reference follows:

Every electrical engineer learns early of the two Kirchhoff laws, but not very many realize that they were published while he was still a student. The publication is {(vom Studiosus) Kirchhoff, “Ueber den Durchgang eines elektrischen Stromes durch eine Ebene, insbesonere durch eine kreisförmige,” [Mitglied des physikalischen Seminars zu Konigsberg] Annalen der Physik und Chemie, Vol. 64, No. 4, 1845, pp. 487 - 514}. In this the voltage law appears as an undisplayed equation at the top of page 502 and the current law is proven (and displayed) as part I of a theorem on page 513 of the same work. As he states in the first paragraph, the work is a continuation of that of Ohm. A portrait of Kirchhoff, taken from the cover of his collected works, is given in Figure 1.

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  • $\begingroup$ The claim by IEEE about the Kirchoff's paper regarding location of the Kirchhoff's voltage law seems incorrect; I can't find anything about the Kirchhoff's voltage law on top of the page 502. However, Kirchhoff does state his 2nd law in that paper, but it is the general version in terms of sum of EMFs in a closed conductive path (not in terms of potential differences) at the bottom of page 513. $\endgroup$ Aug 15, 2021 at 12:10

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