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Are permanent magnets depleted when they induce electric currents in conductors by movement.

If a permanent magnet is moved so that it induces a current in an electrical conductor that is connected in a circuit with a load resistor causing power to be dissipated in the resistor through heat, does this cause a reduction in the magnetic strength of the permanent magnet. If yes, would continuing to do this eventually remove all of the magnetism from the permanent magnet? I know that mechanical power is being expended through the physical moving of the magnet so is the electrical power dissipated in the load resistor just all a transfer from the mechanical power used to move the magnet, or is something taken out of the magnet itself?

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No, permanent magnets are not depleted or reduced in strength when they induce electrical currents by being moved. The energy associated with the induced current is not taken from the magnet itself, but from whatever object provides the force-times-distance work to move the magnet against the resistance it experiences against being moved. And the magnet will indeed feel a resistance against movement since any movement of the magnet toward a conductor will induce electrical currents in that conductor which will give rise to a magnetic field in that conductor that will act to repel the magnet from the conductor.

There is a magnetic energy associated with a permanent magnet, but I'm not aware of any easy way to extract it by any means as simple as moving it towards a conductor.

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