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We know more gravity slows down time per Einsteins Theory of Relativity. However will a significantly less gravitational pull speed up time? Or is "our time" aka earth standard of time the fastest possible time we can achieve? If not how would we create/experience a faster time? Could this be used as a means of Faster-than-light travel or rather faster-than-time travel? How would such a phenomenon exist? Would for instance Mercury experience faster time (assuming we could get close enough without burning up.)

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closed as unclear what you're asking by ACuriousMind, Bill N, Emilio Pisanty, user36790, Danu Oct 3 '15 at 12:11

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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There are a few problems with this question, but also the potential to answer some parts.

The short answer is that reduced gravity (in relation to an observer who is far removed, as you mentioned frequently) will allow time to appear to pass more quickly (once again, relative to us, as the other answer said.) This would not mean that time would be observed at that point to be going faster or slower than it would be seen by the observer if they were anywhere else in the universe- So basically, no. The reason I did not offer an outright affirmative or negative answer is because you may have some misconceptions that an easy answer would do nothing to help resolve. Time is dependent on the observer, but the observer always sees their time as the same. It is now quite the observer paradox, but the inverse. We are not separate from the time you describe, so seeing a difference in it would be impossible.

The answer to your questions about traveling through space/time faster than light/time is also no, but your questions seem to have misconception/incomplete understanding at their root. The Alcubierre metric describes something tangentially related to what you are talking about, but in less preposterous terms. It uses the relation of warping of spacetime to energy density to postulate that (nonlocal) superluminal travel is possible by using a negative energy density(again, theoretical) in conjunction with a positive energy density to create a type of ¨warp drive.¨ But that does not have much of anything to do with the properties of time in general relativity relating to gravity, moreso with the nature of propagation of changes in spacetime.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I will admit I have a basic understanding of physics so my question may seem odd but you explained it well. I have to look into the Alcubierre Metric. $\endgroup$ – Dynas Oct 2 '15 at 17:34
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"Local" time is invariant. It does not respond to gravity, or speed, or anything else. All you can ever experience is Time. You can't travel faster than light or time. An object sitting on top of Mt. Everest will experience time as being unchanged, but us folk at sea level will perceive it as ticking very slightly faster. So there is no such thing as "our time" in the first place.

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