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I have a modification to ${\rm MOND}$ that appears to work much better than 'Standard' ${\rm MOND}$ at the galactic scale. I want to test this model now on larger structures. Does anyone know where I can find kinematic data on galaxy clusters, preferably some 'gold' standard that people have been examining for years. I know that the missing mass is a classic problem and that galaxy clusters are a problem for ${\rm MOND}$ as well as $\Lambda{\rm CDM}$. I need basically the total mass of the cluster, the radial location of each galaxy in the cluster, and the line of sight velocity of the galaxy.

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  • $\begingroup$ I tweaked the list of information you want for each galaxy to be a bit clearer (I hope), and in the case of line of sight velocity, more realistic (the actual rotation velocity is not a measurable quantity for a galaxy in a cluster). $\endgroup$ – Kyle Oman Sep 2 '15 at 17:36
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I had a bit of a search around and didn't find exactly what you're looking for. There are certainly such catalogues that exist (I have one I made myself, and I've heard of others), but most groups seem to only provide the cluster catalogue (list of clusters, but without list of members for each cluster). This is probably because cluster member identification is still an active research area and any catalogue is constantly updated or quickly obsolete, and subject to many uncertainties and idiosyncrasies, making it unfit for uninformed public consumption. The list of clusters (or their BCGs), on the other hand, is much more stable. So what I'd suggest is getting a cluster catalogue and cross-correlating it yourself against an appropriate galaxy catalogue. You could use for instance these clusters (publication) with SDSS DR9 as a galaxy catalogue, though of course there are many other options that may be more suited to your problem. It's probably worth reading up on state of the art cluster membership algorithms and finding/asking for/writing a good implementation to get your members.

Probably not as easy as you were hoping, but hey, that's research I guess...

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As near as I can tell, the 'gold' standard for Galaxy Clusters is the Coma Cluster. It's where Dark Matter was first detected and still appears to have a lot of papers dedicated to it's kinematics and evolution. I found one fellow who has taken the time to download the NED database and clean it up himself. It can be found here:

http://pw2.netcom.com/~ahighe/a1656.htm

There's also the NED database. If you enter the cluster's designation (e.g. A 1656), the cluster's approximate radius (in arcmin), you can get a pretty good set of data in ASCII, HTML or XML form:

https://ned.ipac.caltech.edu/forms/nearname.html

Hope this helps someone with a similar need.

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