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When a permanent magnet is held motionless close to a salt solution which already has been exposed to an electrical field a flow in the water will be induced and can be detected by applying some grains. I would explain this phenomenon as a consequence of a force pushing the moving ions perpendicular to their original direction between the electical poles. So moving ions in water seem to be able to interact with the water molecules and move them. But the motion of ions occured already before the magnet was applied. Why is it so that only the deflection of ionic movement results in a detectable water motion? I would be very satisfied if I would be able to come up with a streight forward explanation to my young students.

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  • $\begingroup$ Bear in mind that the Earth has a magnetic field $\endgroup$ – user56903 Apr 23 '16 at 14:10
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The critical observation here is that before the magnet is introduced, there are equal numbers of oppositely charged ions moving in opposite directions, exerting no net force on the water around them. The magnet, however, will deflect a positive ion going one way in the same direction as it will deflect a negative ion going the other way. This produces a net flow of ions in the direction of the deflection, and thus a net force on the water.

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The electron was the number of electron which has number of charge is $1.6\cdot10^{-18}\,$eV. As the electric field is the region in which charged particles experience the force to perpendicular direction between electrical poles.The moving ions consists of positive charge and negative charge therefore the cations and anions which can be moving ions in original direction between electrical poles.Thus,the electromagnetism concept should be use the electrodes to be electromagnet being wrapped round the electrodes by copper wire as the resistance lower, the current must be increase to be magnetized.

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    $\begingroup$ This answer is unreadable. What are you trying to say? $\endgroup$ – Duncan Harris Apr 23 '16 at 12:51

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