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Walking requires friction and gravity, would humans be able to walk faster in different strength gravitational field than that of earth's?

What strength of gravity would allow an average human to walk fastest in?

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If a human is physically incredibly strong, and can push up off the ground no matter the gravitational pull, then the maximum amount of gravitational force the person can push off in would make him walk the fastest. My reasoning behind this is if he/she has no trouble pushing off the ground, and all that matters is minimizing the duration the persons foot is in the air, since the person can't "pull" themselves back to the ground, and all objects accelerate down at a uniform rate.

Applying this to your question about an average person, it all comes down to how much (gravitational) force their legs can withstand to push away from the ground, hence, the higher the gravitational pull, the faster a human can "potentially" walk in it, gathered that the gravity is not so big as to prevent the person from being able to push off of the ground or to not tire out too fast.

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    $\begingroup$ Indeed to zeroth order walking is just falling forward as an inverted pendulum. Higher $g$ means shorter period, which equates to moving faster. Anything more sophisticated is no longer physics but biology. $\endgroup$
    – user10851
    Aug 21, 2015 at 7:01

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