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I am reading concepts of modern physics (by Arthur Beiser) where he calculates the de Broglie wave velocity. For that he uses the relation $v = fλ$ where $v$, $f$, and $λ$ are velocity (de Broglie wave), frequency, and wavelength, respectively. Now for the wavelength, he uses the de Broglie wavelength and for frequency he writes:

$E = \gamma mc^2 =hf$.

But can I apply $E=hf$ to a particle having mass? I thought it applied only to photons?

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    $\begingroup$ Please fix all the spelling errors. The browser helps you by underlining them. I would also encourage you to clean up the punctuation etc. $\endgroup$ – DanielSank Aug 13 '15 at 5:07
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It works fine. The reason you usually see it applied to photons is because people already believe light is waves when they start learning QM, so they accept it has a frequency.

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Well, mathematically you can. It's like calculating your wavelength while driving your car λ = h / mv where (m is your car's mass, v is the velocity)

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