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I'm currently using Gray and Gubbins Theory of Molecular Fluids to learn about the statistical physics of fluids. It may be a fine reference text, but I'm not impressed with it as an introduction to the subject. Its organization seems poor, new symbols are constantly introduced with little motivation, and there is a major lack of solved problems. Results are simply quoted, with the assumption that the reader will read the original papers to learn more. Is there a better introductory book? I need one which explicitly deals with anisotropic interactions.

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My absolute favorite book on the subject is the one that we used in our Gas Dynamics class: Introduction to Physical Gas Dynamics by Vincenti and Kruger.

I had never had an introduction to statistical mechanics prior to this book and it does a great job developing the requirements as they are needed and providing motivation for the path it takes. I also find it very easy to read and very approachable, both in terms of writing style and notation. I still pick it up to read it from time to time just because I like it that much.

Perhaps the best part for my preferences is that it spends more than half the book looking at real, applicable flows -- supersonic and hypersonic flows, chemically reacting flows, and radiative transfer in flows.

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