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Similar to my other question

If you are to pass a magnet through a solenoid a current is produced in the solenoid due to the magnetic flux. However, if you were to have a magnet sit inside a solenoid, and apply a specific current through the solenoid, would the magnet be able to be moved outside of the solenoid? More specifically, would it be possible to use this effect to create a 'solenoid gun' or cannon/launcher? According to this wiki page we are able to reach stable magnetic fields of up to 45 Tesla's with bitter electromagnets. Would this technology be applicable in this question? [Even if it were to get destroyed after one time use]

Another question about this device is, if you were able to create a theoretical 'solenoid gun', would it produce any recoil? Or would the energy only be applied to the circuit's current and the projectile? Would the 'forces' on the circuit end up being equivalent to physical recoil?

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    $\begingroup$ Sounds like you've reinvented the coilgun (similar, yet distinct, from the more commonly known railgun). $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Aug 5 '15 at 16:05
  • $\begingroup$ @KyleKanos Thank you for the links. I would still be interested in the answer for the second parts of the question. Also if there would be any significant differences if you allowed the device to be designed for a one use only. (if you could get more out of it) $\endgroup$ – Mark N Aug 5 '15 at 16:23
  • $\begingroup$ I would suspect there would be recoil, but never having made one I really couldn't say. Obviously would be minimal compared to the typical handgun's recoil due to the way each works. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Aug 5 '15 at 16:29
  • $\begingroup$ @Kyle, momentum man. Momentum. $\endgroup$ – dmckee --- ex-moderator kitten Aug 5 '15 at 17:55
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    $\begingroup$ @dmckee I assume he calls the recoil "minimal" because, lacking a mechanical firing system or any propellant, the change of momentum is equal between the weapon and the projectile; in a typical firearm there is a kick from the spring-loaded firing mechanism, and a large portion of the energy is wasted on accelerating the combustion gases, so the weapon gains more momentum (recoil than the bullet. $\endgroup$ – Asher Aug 5 '15 at 20:02
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RE to your second query, In all possibility the answer is yes, it will produce a recoil. Apart from the EM fields used up in accelerating the projectile, do realize that the projectile and the gun initially are one system and afterwards the projectile leaves the the projectile-gun system with some energy. This whole scenario is simple classical mechanics. Ergo, the very 'firing' can be considered as an isolated system with mass leaving the system which in return will produce a recoil.

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RE to your first question - "have a magnet sit inside a solenoid, and apply a specific current through the solenoid, would the magnet be able to be moved outside of the solenoid". This is a yes. If the permanent magnet in the coil is situated off center in the solenoid and the solenoid creates a repulsive field to the field of the permanent magnet, the magnet will be accelerated away from the solenoid. The north-south field of the magnet needs to be opposed by a south-north field of the solenoid. With regards to the high field of the bitter magnets - the permanent magnet will likely be demagnetized or even reverse magnetized in high fields before it can be accelerated.

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I think there may be recoil. Think of a slingshot. When the load is released the energy in the rubber straps pulls the load forward and pushes the handle backward while your hand pushes forward to hold the handle still. When the load is gone your hand will continue to push forward for an instant causing a forward movement, not a recoil. With a coil gun the magnetic force replaces force in the rubber straps, but it would all happen in an instant with no time for you to adjust by pushing forward or backward. So that initial push backward might be experienced as recoil.

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