3
$\begingroup$

When a conductor induces eddy currents that creates a magnetic field opposing the change that created it, would the two fields at some point cancel out?

enter image description here

Imagine the change to be so great, it induces currents creating a magnetic field equal and opposing the one applied in the exterior(by the solenoid) would they cancel out and the net-effect is zero?

And in general, would to opposing magnetic field's cancel out?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ In general... Two opposing magnetic fields can cancel out each other... as in... there will be points in between the two opposing magnetic fields where there will be no field lines. $\endgroup$ – Pranav Jul 30 '15 at 4:27
1
$\begingroup$

Only in a perfect diamagnetic. In a real conductor the induced magnetic field is limited by the resistance of the material, so it will always be smaller than the inducing field.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

To a degree the answer is yes, but as another person mentioned, it would not be an equal cancelation of zero. The two repelling fields would always sustain their own magnetic field, but the closer the two fields are they would create antigravity.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Opposing fields never cancel out yet the net effects at the point of collision would be zero if influencing such as another coil. if, as per your example produces eddy currents that oppose each other the net effects of the opposing field pressure would increase by the square of the two fields. in your example the field line pressure is increase causing the object to lift off the bottom metal plate.

plain answer is no, the opposing eddy current field is never as strong as the field that created it.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.