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I have studied the dual nature of the light as particle nature & wave nature.

A photon of light energy can knock a single electron out of certain metals (usually having less forbidden-energy-gap) called photo-electric emission which shows particle nature of light.

While the phenomenon of Interference (which may be constructive or destructive depending on the wave equations) shows the wave nature of light.

The question is: Do all the electromagnetic radiations show dual nature same as that of light if "yes" then explain how? & if "no" then explain why?

Thanks in advance!

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    $\begingroup$ Yes, because all electromagnetic radiation can be described by photons or waves. $\endgroup$ – HDE 226868 Jul 17 '15 at 20:53
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    $\begingroup$ All electromagnetic energies are described by the same equations - they all exhibit duality. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Jul 17 '15 at 21:02
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Yes, everything shows wave-particle duality to varying degrees because "wave-particle duality" is just a name for a certain behaviour of quantum objects, and everything is believed to be a quantum object.

In particular, all electromagnetic radiation can be conceived of as being made of photons, which exhibit particle- and wave-like properties.

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Yes, all electromagnetic radiation shows this 'dual nature' - which is to be expected since there is nothing really separating light from the other radiation in the spectrum apart from the arbitrary boundaries we have decided for it (i.e. visible light is just defined by what humans can see).

As you'll discover as you learn more about quantum mechanics, photons (and other particles for that matter), are not described by having a 'dual nature', rather their apparent 'dual nature' is a consequence of the quantum mechanical laws which they follow, which may seem counter-intuitive and are unlike any of the classical mechanisms you are used to.

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