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If you take away electrons or add electrons to a body of water will the evaporation rate be changed? (Even if it's brief or the effect is small)

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The evaportation rate is given by $${dM \over dt} \sim T$$

where $M$ is the amount of evaporated water and $t$ is the time. $T$ is the temperature of the water. However, $${dM \over dt} \sim Q$$ Where Q is the charge of the water, to prove my point, consider a lightning bolt impacting water. The water is split into hydrogen and oxygen through electrolysis. The liquid is turned into gas so IMO the water evaporated. However, the evaporation is also be dependent on the rate of change of charge, which is the current, so don't take that as the final word on the matter.

You should consider the fact that introducing extra electrons will indivertibly introduce heat energy, through intermolecular resistance, which would rise the temperature of the water. So even if the above is false, the above relation still holds for the reason mentioned in this paragraph.

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