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It is known that the Higgs boson gives mass to elementary particles. Also known that if manipulate with the Higgs field and decrease mass of particles then atoms starts to decay and the object will be radioactive. Is it possible to manipulate with the Higgs field so that is both decrease the mass of the object and that the object was not becomes radioactive ?

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  • $\begingroup$ It would be better that in addition to the set of minuses also give an explanation. if you don't know better not to put meaningless minuses. $\endgroup$ – Վարդան Գրիգորյան Jul 13 '15 at 8:50
  • $\begingroup$ if you are able to give explanation ... $\endgroup$ – Վարդան Գրիգորյան Jul 13 '15 at 11:56
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    $\begingroup$ Don't worry about it Vardan. I have countered the downvote. $\endgroup$ – John Duffield Jul 13 '15 at 12:42
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Is it possible to decrease the mass of the object?

Perhaps surprisingly the answer is yes. All you need to do is it drop it. Then some of the object's mass-energy, which we call potential energy, is converted into kinetic energy, which ends up getting dissipated. You're then left with a mass deficit. The mass of the object is reduced.

It is known that the Higgs boson gives mass to elementary particles. Also known that if manipulate with the Higgs field and decrease mass of particles then atoms starts to decay and the object will be radioactive. Is it possible to manipulate with the Higgs field so that it both decreases the mass of the object and that the object was not becomes radioactive?

The Higgs boson doesn't give mass to elementary particles. And see A Zeptospace Odyssey by CERN physicist Gian Guidice. He says the Higgs mechanism is only responsible for 1% of the mass of matter, and the rest is down to E=mc². So what you're asking is a non-starter I'm afraid. Even if there was some way to alter space or field akin to what you're suggesting, conservation of energy and E=mc² would mean the mass stays the same.

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    $\begingroup$ The first paragraph is an unusual opinion. Most models of gravitation treat the gravitational potential energy as a property of the gravitational field between the two interacting objects. Dropping an object and allowing the kinetic energy to get radiated away decreases the mass-energy of the object-Earth-field system, but doesn't change the inertial mass of the dropped object or of the Earth. The second paragraph is okay. $\endgroup$ – rob May 26 '18 at 16:00

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