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This question already has an answer here:

We have proved that the universe is expanding by observing distant planets and stars going away from each other.

So can we predict our location in the universe by observing the different propotions of distance of sepration of planets arounds us taking in mind the different distance of those objects, if we are in the center all objects will seperate at the same rate.

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marked as duplicate by ACuriousMind, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, CuriousOne, David Z Jul 7 '15 at 19:18

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    $\begingroup$ The universe has no center. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Jul 7 '15 at 16:24
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    $\begingroup$ And the Big Bang didn't happen at a point. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jul 7 '15 at 16:26
  • $\begingroup$ This is what the big bang is supposed to sound like: faculty.washington.edu/jcramer/BBSound.html. I don't know if that is right or not. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jul 7 '15 at 18:38
  • $\begingroup$ @CuriousOne ok, to be honest, compared to the Fox news depiction of the big bang as pretty obviously a large gasoline explosion, it does not sound right to me. Therefore it's probably right on the money, if a little disappointing in the big bang sound department. $\endgroup$ – user81619 Jul 7 '15 at 19:09
  • $\begingroup$ @AcidJazz: Yeah, it does sound like a whimper (for the sake of avoiding a word closer to the human gut), doesn't it? Sometimes even large science is anti-climactic. :-) $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Jul 7 '15 at 19:11
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Measurements of the expansion of the universe fit within the Cosmological Principle. In a nutshell this means that any observer anywhere in the universe sees the same relative motion of distant galaxies. This means that there is no center to the universe.

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