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I just read that maybe the dark matter could have dark forces.

Hence, I wonder: dark atoms, dark galaxies, dark intelligent beings. Basically a parallel, interpenetrating universe. Is this plausible?

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marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Qmechanic Jun 25 '15 at 18:15

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  • $\begingroup$ No, I'm proposing that it has all the forces of regular matter and they interact with dark matter, but that they do not interact with regular matter - except for gravity of course. $\endgroup$ – Robert Blandford Jun 25 '15 at 17:15
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    $\begingroup$ Maybe Worldbuilding SE is a better place for your question? $\endgroup$ – Bosoneando Jun 25 '15 at 17:22
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    $\begingroup$ @Joshua I think that asking about dark matter selfinteractions is fine here, but going beyond and asking about even dark civilizations... well, it seems a little in the realm of fantasy for me. $\endgroup$ – Bosoneando Jun 25 '15 at 17:28
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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of can we have a parallel earth made of dark matter? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jun 25 '15 at 17:55
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    $\begingroup$ Hi Robert. While chasing down Kyle's suggestion that related questions may exist i've come across a virtually exact duplicate. And indeed Chris White's answer to that question is virtually the same as my answer to this one. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jun 25 '15 at 17:57
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Assuming you take the usual position that dark matter interacts only via the weak and gravitational forces, then it doesn't just interact weakly with baryonic matter but it also interacts weakly with other dark matter. That makes it extremely unlikely that dark matter will form the sort of complex structures that make up you and I. I'm afraid it seems very unlikely that dark matter will form anything more structured than a fuzzy blob.

There have been suggestions for types of dark matter that does interact strongly with itself, but not with baryonic matter. For example mirror matter. However such suggestions are entirely speculative without a shred of experimental evidence to back them up.

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