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I have been searching but cannot seem to find it. I would like to know what the surface gravity of Venus has been observed to be from different missions/probes that were sent to Venus on separate occasions. There have been many missions to Venus, but I can not seem to find any information regarding the measured surface gravity of this planet beyond the Magellan mission. Does anyone happen to know if Venus' surface gravity has been observed outside of Magellan and can give me a source for it?

Update: I am looking for probed observational results instead of derivations using existing calculations.

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NASA's JPL website has a fully referenced table that includes equatorial gravity (i.e. surface gravity at the equator). It looks like, for that table, they get the surface gravity by deriving it using a mass and radius rather than measuring it directly. However the citation for the mass of Venus is an article entitled Venus Gravity: 180th degree and order model, which appears to combine many years of orbital position data for the Pioneer and Magellan Venus orbiters to produce gravity maps for Venus sensitive to its surface topography and upper lithosphere.

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  • $\begingroup$ Hi Kyle, although I appreciate the help, I am looking for probed observational results instead of derivations using existing calculations. Thanks anyways! $\endgroup$ – Alexandru Jun 15 '15 at 20:38
  • $\begingroup$ @Alexandru I think you're unlikely to find other measurements because this quantity can be easily derived - why would NASA spend money on developing, building and launching an instrument to measure surface gravity when it can just be derived (with the same or better accuracy!) from the mass and radius, which can be obtained much more economically? $\endgroup$ – Kyle Oman Jun 15 '15 at 20:40
  • $\begingroup$ There's probably various reasons as to why (Magellan is one such example which took observational measurements using aerobraking: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aerobraking). $\endgroup$ – Alexandru Jun 15 '15 at 21:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Alexandru Reference added including Magellan and Pioneer data; perhaps that will give you a hint for finding analysis of data from more recent orbiters. $\endgroup$ – rob Jun 16 '15 at 0:14
  • $\begingroup$ They probably updated these tables with Venus Express orbital data as well... $\endgroup$ – honeste_vivere Nov 8 '15 at 15:25

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