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  1. How do electrons move?

  2. I mean really do they move?

  3. I read that they move in circular shells AROUND THE NUCLEUS. How can they move in the conductor?

  4. I have read that there are valent electrons that jump! How can they jump?

  5. Why do we use "current means motion of POSITIVE IONS"?

  6. Ions are full atoms?

  7. Then what does actually move?

  8. And how?

I have tried to read many thing on google but they confuse me more.

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closed as too broad by Brian Moths, Kyle Oman, Qmechanic May 29 '15 at 23:46

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ I won't really advice you to dig in this topic for now. You CBSE board will make you even confused. Study the electricity chapter, get some foreign book like Halliday Resnick and read it's chapter. It's a vast topic. You will get even more confused here. Though you are welcome to try. I see many newbies in problem due to this. I don't face this problem, but if you do I would advice you to follow my steps. $\endgroup$ – Amey Shukla May 29 '15 at 18:01
  • $\begingroup$ Related: How do electrons jump orbitals? $\endgroup$ – Kyle Oman May 29 '15 at 19:04
  • $\begingroup$ All of that needs quantum mechanics to answer correctly, which is why you are so confused. You are in good company, just 100 years ago the best physicists in the world were just as confused as you are! $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne May 29 '15 at 22:03
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enter image description here

This is the model of the atom that I think you will best understand. It is called the Bohr model of the atom. As you cans see, the valence electrons are at the very edge.

enter image description here

Metals conduct electricity so easily because their valence electrons are not tightly bound. To put it more simply, the outer electrons can move around freely, without being held back.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yep. That's all you need to learn now to prevent being confused. - To the asker of question. $\endgroup$ – Amey Shukla May 30 '15 at 12:01

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