2
$\begingroup$

For example, if I take a slap shot on a hockey puck, from what I understand, the forces acting on the puck are friction, the normal force, and the puck's weight. And, since I'm not constantly either pushing the puck, or pulling the puck there are no other forces acting on the puck, because me shooting the puck was just a one time force. Am I thinking about this correctly?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Depends on the time frame you look at. You could consider your driving force to be a one time event or you could model it as a time interval of acceleration (which is of course short, compared to the time, the puck travels on ice without this force). $\endgroup$ – engineer May 28 '15 at 6:21
2
$\begingroup$

Yes, you are thinking about it correctly. No force is required to keep the puck in motion. This is an important idea in physics. It is actually a common misconception among physics students that a force is required to keep an object in motion, so it is good you do not have this misconception.

$\endgroup$
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ "Physics students" here includes Aristotle, for instance $\endgroup$ – zeldredge May 27 '15 at 15:34
  • $\begingroup$ Or Zeno who did not believe in motion at all. $\endgroup$ – John Alexiou May 27 '15 at 19:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.