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I know this might sound a silly question though For a spring that is compressed lets say x meters by a force F N. what is coefficient of elasticity of the spring? We are not given the equilibrium length of the spring.

Is it the spring constant then?

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  • $\begingroup$ Usually the spring constant is defined as the force divided by the displacement from equilibrium. Why do you think that would not apply here? $\endgroup$ – Floris May 11 '15 at 10:49
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Assuming that we remain in the regime where Hooke's law applies, in this context, there is no difference between the coefficient of elasticity and the spring constant, simply given by $$k=\frac Fx.$$ I think your confusion might be arising from your interpretation of "compressed [...] x meters by a force F N". I would understand this to mean "compressed x meters from its equilibrium length", not "compressed to x meters".

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