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Why doesn't the electric potential constantly decrease in a circuit as the current moves from the positive to the negative terminal?

Details and Assumptions: 1. The wires show no resistance.

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    $\begingroup$ That totally depends on the circuit. In a circuit with a capacitor the potential will decrease, in a circuit with a power supply that has a virtually infinite capacity to supply energy to the circuit, it does not have to. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Apr 29 '15 at 0:30
  • $\begingroup$ Current only moves from positive to negative in the power source, not in an external circuit. Maybe the battery is going dead. $\endgroup$ – Optionparty Apr 29 '15 at 1:57
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    $\begingroup$ It does........ $\endgroup$ – immibis Feb 11 at 4:27
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In a normal electric circuit, with copper wires at ambient temperature, electric potential does decrease around the circuit, as there will be some resistance and so there has to be a voltage/potential gradient for the current to flow. Copper wires DO have some resistance, so your assumption is invalid in that case.

However, your assumption would be valid for superconducting wires below their critical temperature. Here, the resistance is zero, which means that you can have a current flowing without needing to have any potential gradient or EMF to push it along.

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