0
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

Sky looks blue because because our eyes are sensitive to blue colour. But when viewed through a camera why don't we see violet of the sky even though we can see violet colour of other pictures taken from the camera?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by John Rennie, Chris Mueller, Rob Jeffries, rob, Ruslan Apr 21 '15 at 17:41

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • $\begingroup$ "our eyes are sensitive to blue colour". This statement is independent of whether or not a camera is involved. $\endgroup$ – hft Apr 21 '15 at 15:51
  • $\begingroup$ Hi Varsha, I've linked an exact duplicate of your question. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Apr 21 '15 at 15:52
  • $\begingroup$ Apart from the lower sensitivity to violet, (most off-the-shelf) photo and video cameras are built to produce the same response as the human eye to make pictures appear natural. Though, I'm not sure, how large the deviations are in reality. $\endgroup$ – engineer Apr 21 '15 at 16:15
0
$\begingroup$

Camera sensitivity is a common topic. In short they mimic the sensitivity of the human eye.

Also your statement that we can see violet in pictures of violet objects is not accurate. It refers to violet as a color, not the 'violet wavelengths' of the spectrum. When we see violet objects we do not see 'violet wavelength' light as much as other wavelengths mixing in our eye producing the violet color.

$\endgroup$