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When we are inside a train and we look outside the roadside trees appear to be moving in the opposite direction but when we are inside a plane and look outside the window everything seems to be at rest. Why is that so? The plane is moving so to the passengers inside the plane the outside things (clouds etc) should appear to be moving, but why don't they?

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  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicates: physics.stackexchange.com/q/116425/2451 , physics.stackexchange.com/q/130999/2451 , physics.stackexchange.com/q/114748/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Apr 20 '15 at 11:48
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    $\begingroup$ hi Sagnic. When you are in a train and you look at a distant mountain, does it move? It is a matter of distance and relative velocity $\endgroup$ – anna v Apr 20 '15 at 11:49
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    $\begingroup$ When you see movies about flying, they try to make it exciting by zipping in and out between clouds, so you get a sense of speed. In real flying, you want it to be as boring as possible. You stay far away from clouds, and everything else, if you have a choice. Clouds are bumpy, they block your vision, and other planes can be hiding in them. $\endgroup$ – Mike Dunlavey Apr 20 '15 at 12:26
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    $\begingroup$ ^ this. Clouds = lack of fun for flying (except with IFR, which doesn't care about clouds (unless they are storm clouds)). $\endgroup$ – Jim Apr 20 '15 at 12:27
  • $\begingroup$ I've never thought objects outside of an airplane appear to be at rest when the plane is moving. They seem to appear at the front edge of the window and move across the field of view in the opposite direction from the direction the plane is going in, and then they disappear from view at the rear edge of the window. Hopefully my experience in this regard is not unique. $\endgroup$ – Todd Wilcox May 26 '15 at 18:17
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You must have watched only the uniform blue sky, otherwise we do can see things passing by. :)

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