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I was thinking about problem that i don't really know the answer to.

A circuit is set up with one battery and two identical lamps in series. Like so

Circuit

I know that electrons flow in the opposite direction of the current so my question is which lamp glows brighter,the one through which electrons travel first (B) or the current (A) ?

(the lamps have some resistance)

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    $\begingroup$ There seems to be a misconception: electric current is electron flow (in a circuit). Also, in a series circuit, the current flowing through both lamps is the same. $\endgroup$ – Fermi paradox Apr 13 '15 at 12:11
  • $\begingroup$ @user5061 But Since the voltage is different wont the lamps glow differently $\endgroup$ – xncrya Apr 13 '15 at 12:12
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    $\begingroup$ Your question is riddled with misconceptions. Please read this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_current $\endgroup$ – Hasan Apr 13 '15 at 12:16
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    $\begingroup$ Too many to state. The current through a closed loop is the same throughout it. Physically only the electronic current travels. The term current can be used for electric as well as conventional current and they differ only by a minus sign, and conventional current does not exist in reality. To summarize, only one of your currents will flow, and it does not really matter which one, and the bulbs will glow equally if they are identical. $\endgroup$ – Hasan Apr 13 '15 at 12:28
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    $\begingroup$ I don't know why this has sparked such a negative response, and I certainly don't understand the cries of homework. There is I think a misunderstanding here, but it is very subtle, revolving around the difference between steady state and transience in a circuit. $\endgroup$ – user10851 Apr 14 '15 at 6:50
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The current is the conventional current in the opposite direction to the electrons current but they are the same thing , the current is the same in series connections. If the two lamps are identical they will give the same amount of light.

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Since the lamps are in series, the electric current through each is identical; all of the current out of one lamp is in to the other lamp; if there is a flow through one, there is a flow through the other. It cannot be that there is a flow through one and not the other (in the context of this simple model).

Thus, if the lamps are identical, their brightness is identical. This is all there is to it.


Regarding the distinction between electric current (flow of electric charge) and electron current (flow of electrons), the flow of electrons counter-clockwise is an electric current clockwise since electrons carry negative electric charge.

In an electrolyte, for example, the flow of both positive and negative charge carriers contribute to the overall electric current. The direction of the electric current is the direction of the flow of positive charge. Thus, a flow to the right of positively charged ions and a flow to the left of negatively charge ions contribute to the electric current to the right.

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