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In chemistry, the reaction at negative electrode produces electrons,which flow to the positive electrode through the circuit. But then, if circuit has a conductor, then wouldn't it also release electrons, thereby increasing the current? Similarly in diodes, the semiconductor would also release electrons.

If a battery only provides a potential difference, then what happens to the electrons produced in the battery due to chemical reactions?

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  • $\begingroup$ batteries move electrons by pushing them out one end and pulling them from the other end. $\endgroup$ – Anthony Apr 4 '15 at 17:25
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A battery in a circuit normally sources electrons at the negative terminal and sinks electrons at the positive terminal. The chemical reaction at the positive terminal consumes them. The total number of electrons in the battery does not change. Similarly, a diode accepts electrons at the negative terminal and sources electrons at the positive terminal, with no net change to the number of electrons inside.

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