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In electric current both negative particles and positive particles flow but in opposite directions. So why doesn't the conductor's shape deform because its particles are moving here and there? OR is it like this that electric current is the movement of electrons and protons in which electrons move atom to atom. But if the atom to atom thing is true then how will protons move as they are part of the nucleus of atoms itself? Thnx!

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  • $\begingroup$ The protons don't move, for exactly the reason you say - they are the nuclei of the atoms, so they can't. The electrons move from atom to atom, and this doesn't deform the conductor's shape because there are always new electrons coming in from the current source to replace the ones that have left. $\endgroup$ – Nathaniel Mar 23 '15 at 8:36
  • $\begingroup$ But in this article its written that protons movehttp://amasci.com/amateur/elecdir.html $\endgroup$ – Bhavesh Mar 23 '15 at 9:19
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No, they don't. Only some of negative particles (electrons) on the top shell could do that. Atomic nuclei together with inner electronic shells do not move (almost). In metals they form kind of crystalline cubic grid.

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  • $\begingroup$ But in this article its written that protons movehttp://amasci.com/amateur/elecdir.html $\endgroup$ – Bhavesh Mar 23 '15 at 9:20
  • $\begingroup$ @Bhavesh: Did you read the whole article? It says: "Now everyone will rightly tell me that the protons within wires cannot flow, while the electrons can. Yes, this is true... but only true for metals. And it's only true for solid metals. All metals are composed of positively charged atoms immersed in a sea of movable electrons. When an electric current is created within a solid copper wire, the "electron sea" moves forward, but the protons within the positive atoms of copper do not. " $\endgroup$ – RedGrittyBrick Mar 23 '15 at 16:40
  • $\begingroup$ Okay @RedGrittyBrick $\endgroup$ – Bhavesh Mar 24 '15 at 2:05

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