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If we live in a four dimensional world and when we try to find the center of the universe (where the big bang occured) we found that there is no apparent center, could that means that the big bang occured in another dimension? Like in a fifth dimension?

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this may or may not be a misunderstanding, but there is no centre of the universe. Imagine the universe as being the surface of an expanding balloon, with all the galaxies and stars on the surface, being stretched away from each other. Just as there is no centre, for example, of the Earth's surface, there is no centre of the universe. If by 'centre' you mean where the universe started, it started everywhere in space, but space started as a single point which expanded. So I think the answer is either there is no centre or the centre is everywhere. I am unclear what you mean by fourth and fifth dimensions in this context.

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    $\begingroup$ I think OP has heard of the balloon analogy, and is thinking that since the balloon has a center in the third dimension, then the universe might have a center in the fifth dimension. $\endgroup$ – user70720 Mar 13 '15 at 14:59
  • $\begingroup$ As for the big bang point, OP is probably confusing himself over thinking that since the balloon expands from its third dimensional center, the big bang must have expanded over some hypothetical fifth dimensional center. $\endgroup$ – user70720 Mar 13 '15 at 15:01

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