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As the influence of gravity is infinite throughout the universe.is the influence of its force on a body very far away faster than the speed of light.suppose a star dies...is the influence of its gravity on us proportional to the light the we are seeing or is its diminished gravity influencing us faster than the light that is reaching us

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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of The speed of gravity? $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Mar 10 '15 at 16:36
  • $\begingroup$ Is it? Is there actually any gravity from a neutrino that is 100 light-years away? $\endgroup$ – Jiminion Mar 10 '15 at 16:42
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To answer the main question, yes. Black Holes have such a gravity influence that not even light can escape.

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    $\begingroup$ I think OP is asking if the speed of gravity is faster than the speed of light $\endgroup$ – pentane Mar 10 '15 at 18:34
  • $\begingroup$ Ohhhhhh, OK, thank you for clearing that up. No, nothing is faster than light. It's like a computer, nothing is faster than the speed the information can travel, therefor, nothing is faster than light as light is information sent from one place to the other. $\endgroup$ – Garrett Henson Mar 10 '15 at 18:36
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As the influence of gravity is infinite throughout the universe.

The influence of gravity is not infinite. If you mean roughly the 1/r potential of the Newtonian gravitation, you should learn that it is an approximation. General relativity is the validated theory for cosmological distances, and observations show the effects of gravity are confined and limited.

In addition light is an emergent phenomenon from photons, which come from the underlying quantum mechanical frame of nature. In a similar manner gravitons are expected to build up the space time construction/ curvatures of the universe,( although gravitons are still a hypothesis).

is the influence of its force on a body very far away faster than the speed of light.

No, the influence is not faster than the speed of light, as the speed of light is the speed any zero mass particle will have, and gravitons have zero mass.

suppose a star dies...is the influence of its gravity on us proportional to the light the we are seeing or is its diminished gravity influencing us faster than the light that is reaching us

See the almost duplicate answer here. When we stop seeing the light of the star the gravitational effect will disappear also as the information will come at the speed of light for both light and gravitational field.

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