0
$\begingroup$

Since the color of objects depends on the parts of the visible spectrum reflected out and the remaining is absorbed; is there any maximum limit to which the absorption can take place? In other words, is there a saturation point beyond which the object can no longer absorb any of the incident light and will start reflecting the entire incident light, possibly changing its color to that of white light?

Is this phenomenon possible? In either case why?

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Saturable absorbers exist and are used in various laser setups. You can check it out on Wikipedia. Also, if you hit something with enough light you can melt it, which would tend to change its appearance... $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Mar 10 '15 at 16:20
0
$\begingroup$

Reflection like transmission are active process involving the electrons around the atoms interacting with the electric field of the incident light. If the intensity is too high, heating (vigorous all molecule movements) will result and the specimen is damaged. If the frequency is too high, the molecules are disfigured and the specimen is simply pierced through (recall the laser gun and x-rays). For moderate energy values, you could have nonlinear materials that change properties with intensity and this is used in the modulation of laser beams for example

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.