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An example of inertia in action is trying to slow down to a complete stop after running a race . what could you do in this situation to increase your inertia? would this help you slow down more quickly or more slowly? explain why

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closed as too broad by John Rennie, ACuriousMind, Kyle Kanos, Sofia, Bernhard Mar 8 '15 at 14:58

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Inertia is a result of mass. The only way to increase your inertia is to gain mass. Momentum is inertia in motion. momentum = mass (inertia) x velocity The higher the velocity to higher the momentum, making the person harder to stop. So to answer your question, if two runs ran at the same speed, but one had more inertia, that one would have a harder time stopping. At the same time, the one with higher inertia would have a harder time getting to the same velocity as the guy with less inertia.

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