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As of i know that a solar cell consists of a transistor(NP) .First step it creates a barrier between the n type and the p type junction.Then following that the sunlight i.e,(the photons) supply energy to the electrons in the p type semiconductor and thus the electrons of the p type semiconductor bypass the barrier between the n type and p type semiconductor and then it flows through the load wire and thus we get electricity.. My question is "Will the electrons of the p type semiconductor never get over"? How does it constantly supply current ?

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    $\begingroup$ What does "never get over" mean? It constantly supplies current because it is constantly being bombarded with new photons that release electrons as you described it. $\endgroup$ – Steeven Mar 1 '15 at 7:08
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The photon striking in the region of the n-p junction kicks an electron up to a high "valence band" and that electron then travels to an area of lower potential at the junction between the n-material and one of the sets of conductors. At the same time the hole left behind in the p-material drifts toward the conductor on the other side of the diode and merges with an electron there to resolve the charge separation. The process is repeated as frequently as the photons keep arriving.

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  • $\begingroup$ "The process is repeated as frequently as the photons keep arriving." I thought solar cells had a maximum saturation luminosity (photon flux)? $\endgroup$ – Brandon Enright Mar 1 '15 at 7:29
  • $\begingroup$ Right. ... better to say "as frequently as photons interact with atoms in the junction layer up to the saturation rate." Exceeding that rate results in heat generation without current. $\endgroup$ – DWin Mar 1 '15 at 15:35

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