2
$\begingroup$

Moving sufficiently far away from a light source one would not be able to measure a steady stream of light, but only single photons every now an then. The experience would be a very faint blinking.

Can this behavior be translated to gravity? From what I understand gravity is similarly quantized and transmitted via gravitons. How would one experience/measure gravity, sufficiently far away from every other body of mass? As a blinking of gravity? A tug of Planck-force every now and then? What is the mental picture to paint here?

Edit:
As an interested layman I deduced the necessity to quantize gravity by the necessity to quantize the attractive force it causes between objects (space and time are quantized, therefore acceleration must be, therefore force must be as well). I then further assumed, that these "quantum force packets" are equivalent to a graviton. The first couple of answers indicate, that this assumption is wrong.
So, my rephrased question is: How would one experience/measure the force, induced by gravity, sufficiently far away from every other body of mass?

$\endgroup$
1

3 Answers 3

1
$\begingroup$

From what I understand gravity is similarly quantized and transmitted via gravitons.

Well, we don't know that. There is no accepted quantum theory of gravity, only approximations like semiclassical approaches. We cannot give you a "mental picture" at the moment because we don't have one. We can speculate all day, and extrapolate from all the other forces and such, but we cannot, with the certainty usually required of scientific theories, proclaim anything definite about the way gravity works at the quantum scale.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

One doesn't. We haven't even detected gravitational waves, much less single quanta of gravitational waves. As of now, gravitons are a theoretical idea derived by extending quantum mechanical ideas to general relativity.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Quite probably gravitons can cause similar effects as photons. The reason I believe so is that gravitons arise by quantizing linearized gravity (linear approximation to GR), the procedure is very similar to quantization of electromagnetism. Individual gravitons have the usual relativistic energy and momentum relation to frequency (energy-density is well-defined in linearized gravity, contrary to GR).

Thus it seems gravitons should scatter from matter as photons do - the only differences are the extremely low probability of scattering (gravitation is a very weak force) and the fact that gravitons have usually very low frequencies, making them quite undetectable.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.