1
$\begingroup$

I have been trying to understand clearly the concept of non locality, hidden variables, quantum measurement etc through research papers. I also read Quantum Theory and measurment by Wheeler and Zurek but I feel I've got nothing into my head. Please recommend some introductory books on above mentioned topics for beginners.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

Lectures on Quantum Theory: Mathematical and Structural Foundations by Chris Isham is a thin, easy to read book. The first 6 or so chapters are a simple introduction to quantum mechanics, but from about chapter 7 or 8 he goes into the Quantum Measurement problem and various interpretations and their associated difficulties. He also discusses Bell's Theorem, Gleason's Theorem and other results. It does not go very deep, but I found it to be an excellent beginner's introduction.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I disrecommend Zurek's book. Zurek has an opinion on measurement that is not so much accepted. He proposed a solution to the so-called collapse, but the solution doesn't solve the issue. It's recommendable to read unbiased books. $\endgroup$ – Sofia Feb 27 '15 at 11:47
0
$\begingroup$

Most papers on quantum mechanics don't explain issues like interpretation clearly and non-locality clearly. The most notable exceptions to this are David Deutsch and to a lesser extent David Wallace.

"The Fabric of Reality" by David Deutsch is a popular book that explains quantum mechanics, see especially chapter 2. See also "The Beginning of Infinity" by Deutsch, Chapters 11 and 12.

If you are willing to do a little matrix algebra you might want to try his lectures on quantum computation:

http://www.quiprocone.org/Protected/DD_lectures.htm.

Deutsch has also written two papers explaining why quantum mechanics is entirely local:

http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/9906007

http://arxiv.org/abs/1109.6223.

You might think that Bell's theorem implies non-locality but it doesn't. Bell's theorem explains that if you had a theory that describes the world using stochastic variables, then to reproduce Bell type correlations it would have to be non-local. But a quantum mechanical system is described by an algebra of Hermitian operators, not by stochastic variables. So Bell's theorem doesn't imply that quantum mechanics is non-local.

David Wallace also has some papers explaining various issues such as the measurement problem:

http://users.ox.ac.uk/~mert0130/papers-ev.shtml.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.