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Is there any particle or anything that could attract and trap light or photon particle? Can anti photon particle attract photons and trap them ?

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Black holes precisely do the same but they aren't particles. Anything with a mass-energy and/or momentum will affect a photon according to the general theory of relativity.

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    $\begingroup$ Maybe you could expand your answer a bit about photon orbits around a black hole en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… $\endgroup$ – anna v Jan 30 '15 at 19:14
  • $\begingroup$ A black hole will make a photon spiral into it. $\endgroup$ – Coward Feb 2 '15 at 0:03
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The photon is its own antiparticle -- an anti-photon is the same as a photon.

To be trapped in the sense we normally use it, the particle should experience a force or potential energy. The photon doesn't interact with electromagnetic fields that are used to trap matter, so it can't be trapped in that way. In general relativity, gravitational fields can deflect light, but not trap it.

According to special relativity, a photon can never be at rest. In any frame, its speed will be $c$.

Something that might be thought of as a 'trap' for a photon is an optical cavity. Here, a photon between two highly reflective mirrors can make many back-and-forth bounces before escaping/being absorbed, which you could think of of being trapped.

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    $\begingroup$ Upvote for the third paragraph. I don't see the relevancy of the first two paragraphs. But for both the OP and this answer, I think the particle metaphor for a photon is dangerous, and can lead to serious misunderstanding. The photon in the cavity is better thought of as being an excitation of the cavity mode, filling the entire cavity. A bouncing particle picture works only for some purposes, but not for others. Nonetheless, there is a sense in which a photon can be thought of as trapped in the cavity. $\endgroup$ – garyp Jan 30 '15 at 19:58
  • $\begingroup$ Isn't that 3rd paragraph called a laser (or *maser if you wish, depending on the photon frequency). $\endgroup$ – Pieter Geerkens Jan 30 '15 at 22:44
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    $\begingroup$ @PieterGeerkens - no for a laser, you need a gain medium as well. $\endgroup$ – Gremlin Feb 3 '15 at 10:13

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