2
$\begingroup$

According to various sources, the Casimir effect could theoretically be used to stabilize a two-way wormhole because it "simulates" the negative energy exotic matter that would normally be required. For this to work, would you literally sandwich a wormhole between two plates? I've heard that it might actually involve positioning charged metal balls in the mouths, but the linked article was behind a paywall.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Please specify "various sources". $\endgroup$ – DanielSank Jan 23 '15 at 21:51
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Wikipedia, Scientific American, the Kavli Institute—basically everything that comes up when you Google "casimir effect wormhole." As far as I can see, they all indicate that it's done with metal plates, but the negative energy density is created between them, and a "traversable" wormhole that requires passengers to be squeezed thinner than 10 nm seems like it would make for a relatively unpleasant trip. $\endgroup$ – AdamHovorka Jan 23 '15 at 21:58
3
$\begingroup$

The Casimir effect is of interest because it is one of the earliest effect that was discovered to violate most energy conditions without any restrictions - it produces negative energies in a static manner. As such, it violates the Null Energy Condition, the Averaged Null Energy Condition and is not constrained all that much by the Quantum Inequalities.

While that is all very good, it also has quite a few drawbacks. The Casimir effect is very small, it requires very close proximity of two conductors, real conductors are not perfect conductors which makes it even less pronounced in real applications, and of course, the most important part, there are two giants sources of energy right next to it, the metal plates themselves. Due to that, if you can indeed form a wormhole from the Casimir effect (just the fact that it violates energy condition does not guarantee that it can), it is likely to be of extremely small size, due to both the very small negative energy and the fact that it has to be far away enough from the plates themselves.

On a more theoretical side, we also don't know if the Casimir effect is actually of negative energy. All that we know is that in QFT, it is of lower energy than the ground state. Experimentally checking if the energy is indeed negative would require testing gravitational effects, since only those actually care about the absolute energy.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Indeed if the exotic matter is between the plates then you need each wormhole mouth to have its throat between two plates.

The more extreme the negative energy density you need the closer together the plates need to be.

So the wormhole becomes quite small to fit inside. I agree that doesn't sound fun.

Of you managed to make it and separate the mouths then you could at least then put each mouth between its own plates and move the. Away from each other. Of course if the time dilation near each wormhole gets out of sink and they are a distance a way then eventually closed time like curves develop. And some people think that will lead to an instability and an increase in energy density. This might counter the Casmir effect.

So in the end it might be a short lived wormhole.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

We know that a wormhole is made up of energy. When we talk about 'Energy', we actually refer to positive energy. A wormhole connecting two distinct points in spacetime is created by warping the Spacetime 'fabric'. As astrophysicists suggest that a wormhole is unstable and may occur for a very short amount of time, it needs to be stabilized and prevented from closing up. This can be done by providing the hypothetical negative energy to the walls of the wormhole from the inside(Casimir Effect).. At present, as we haven't created a wormhole for our size and of course Negative Matter/Energy, the Casimir effect is yet to be proved practically.. This answer may not be completely true..its just from my point of view(i'm just a grade 10 Student).

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

I'm a 10th grade student as well. I think the more we apply the -ve energy to the internal surface of a wormhole the more it will stretch out to get bigger in size. By increasing the negative energy meaning logically decreasing the energy. Cause the more the energy goes in the minus form the more will the wormhole grow bigger in size and will also elongate the extent of that wormhole...... Well, this is what I think .

$\endgroup$
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Physics SE. Please note that answers must be well-researched and usually should agree with results presented in conventional textbooks. Personal opinions and hypothetical theories are usually not considered as answers. $\endgroup$ – GodotMisogi Feb 8 at 10:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.