2
$\begingroup$

This question already has an answer here:

If there is no friction in space, then how does the space shuttle boost?

According to Newton's law we move by pushing something; in space, there is vacuum, so how the space shuttle moves without friction?

$\endgroup$

marked as duplicate by ACuriousMind, John Rennie, Kyle Kanos, Qmechanic Jan 12 '15 at 18:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Short answer: it moves forwards by casting fuel backwards $\endgroup$ – John Dvorak Jan 12 '15 at 17:29
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Do you mean "if there is no friction in space?" $\endgroup$ – Brionius Jan 12 '15 at 17:29
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Rocket/Thrust/Gas/Free Expansion of Gas $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jan 12 '15 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ Space isn't really a vacuum, though the number density of particles is significantly less than what we have in our atmosphere. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Jan 12 '15 at 17:38
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/158750/2451 $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Jan 12 '15 at 18:07
3
$\begingroup$

It moves by throwing matter in the direction opposite to the direction it intends to move along. (in this case, it ejects its fuel.) Applying the Law of Conservation of Momentum should make it simple enough now.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.