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Light is an electromagnetic radiation contrary to the law of electromagnetism that states that: an accelerated charge produce electromagnetic wave. Please explain.

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marked as duplicate by John Rennie, CuriousOne, Qmechanic Dec 30 '14 at 8:32

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    $\begingroup$ In quantum electrodynamics, photons are the 'mediators' of force between charged particles. $\endgroup$ – theo Dec 30 '14 at 6:37
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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Why is light called an 'electromagnetic wave' if it's neither electric nor magnetic? $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Dec 30 '14 at 6:41
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    $\begingroup$ Where is the contradiction? Light is light and charged particles are charged particles. Accelerate them in just the right way and they make light. See Bremsstrahlung, synchrotron radiation, wiggler and undulator. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Dec 30 '14 at 6:42
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Light is an electromagnetic radiation

correct

contrary to the law of electromagnetism that states that: an accelerated charge produce electromagnetic wave.

No it is not contrary, the electromagnetic wave produced according to Maxwell's equations travels with the speed of light and leaves the charged source.

Is light an electromagnetic wave despite not having charged particles?

All electromagnetic waves originated at the field of a charged particle , either through acceleration or through excitation of atoms and emission of photons, photons being the quanta that build up electromagnetic waves. The light from the sun, for example originated in the electric and magnetic fields of the sun and the plasma of its photosphere, where electrons and nuclei are separated and continue interacting and loosing energy by emitting photons in the field of each other.

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