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Do fiber optical cables used for broadband signals of Internet get any interference due to any nearby microwaves generated in mobile phones?

I learned that fiber optics are used to transmit data in the form of light at different frequencies, does nearby microwave interfere with those light passing through the cable?

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    $\begingroup$ Not likely, unless you are talking about literally frying that fiber bundle in a microwave oven or operating right next to an airport radar antenna where fields can be so high that they change materials that are not designed to withstand them. For anything other scenario I would doubt that there will be a measurable impact. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Dec 20 '14 at 14:53
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No, the signal will not (usually) be corrupted by outside electromagnetic radiation.

Classical electromagnetism tells us that electromagnetic waves interact linearly. Therefore, when microwaves emitted from a nearby tower pass through the fiber, they will interfere with the signal locally, but as the waves pass through each other, they will come out on the other side looking exactly like they did before they ever interacted.

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    $\begingroup$ +1 for linearity - although strictly speaking the answer is "yes" as 'interference' does occur (but only at their intersection). Note that the transceivers (the things that convert electrical signal to light and back again) are susceptible to potential interference although they are in practice well shielded. Similarly, it is possible for cables to pick up RF which can interfere with operation (even for shielded, twisted pair cables.) - but most likely only with field strengths that are orders of magnitude greater than found in cell phone transmission. $\endgroup$ – Floris Dec 20 '14 at 16:14
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No interference can occur as the cable is electrically non-conductive. Source here

Immunity to electromagnetic interference

Light transmission through optical fibers is unaffected by other electromagnetic radiation nearby. The optical fiber is electrically non-conductive, so it does not act as an antenna to pick up electromagnetic signals. Information traveling inside the optical fiber is immune to electromagnetic interference, even electromagnetic pulses generated by nuclear devices.

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  • $\begingroup$ on a lighter note, due to leak from ovens(not a perfect faraday cage i think) , interference can occur between WiFi and microwaves and cause internet problems XD . Ethernet cables for life ! $\endgroup$ – Gowtham Dec 20 '14 at 15:02
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    $\begingroup$ Alternative, if the microwave field is intense enough to affect the materials in the optical fibre cable you are already in serious trouble and losing the Net connection will be the least of your worries! $\endgroup$ – user56903 Dec 20 '14 at 15:08

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