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In our laboratory we use silicon plates named "Zero Diffraction Plates". They are named so because they give extremely low diffraction signals in an XRD instrument (reflection mode). But how are these plates made to ensure such low signals?

I heard they are cut at a specific atomic layer in the crystal; this layer then becomes the surface. Do diffraction on this layer lead to destructive interference at all possible irradiation angles? I would like to at least have a phenomenological understanding of how this works, and I hope someone is able to help.

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Partial answer, from some online forum: the Si is cut on the 5-1-1 plane (not a layer but an orientation). How this orientation leads to zero (or minimal) diffraction is a nasty problem in solid geometry, I fear. For example, here's a paper which discusses a variety of diffraction situations in gory detail.

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