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I was reading this post, but no one seem to go further as say what would happen if you brought the bottle back to Earth? Guess what another thing I'm wanting got know is, what would now be in the bottle now?

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    $\begingroup$ What would be in the bottle? Not much. $\endgroup$ – jwimberley Dec 17 '14 at 17:56
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    $\begingroup$ Strictly speaking, that's not even a good way to make a good vacuum. There would be plenty of outgassing from the stuff that clings to the bottle walls, even when it is exposed to the vacuum of space. You wouldn't even be able to use that vacuum for technological applications like UHV processing in e.g. semiconductor physics, it would be way too dirty. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Dec 17 '14 at 17:59
  • $\begingroup$ Unless it is a sturdy bottle, it would probably implode before you open it on earth again. $\endgroup$ – Michal Paszkiewicz Dec 17 '14 at 18:22
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    $\begingroup$ What do you think will happen, and why? $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Dec 17 '14 at 18:37
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When opening the bottle in space, all the air that was initially in it will flow out due to the pressure difference. The inside of the bottle will then become approximatelly vacuum, so when you open it on Earth air will flow in it again. (Unless it's not sturdy enough (for example a plastic bottle), in which case it will be compressed/crumpelt before you open it).

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  • $\begingroup$ I would be very surprised if one could even open the bottle unless the opening was going "inward." $\endgroup$ – Bill N Oct 11 '15 at 0:20
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When you suck air out of things it compresses. It is not because the air bonds to the bottle but because the out side air pressure is too strong for the material and there is no air inside of the bottle that can counter its own pressure. If you take it in space nothing happens cause there is no pressure on the outside of the bottle.

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It's something I have considered myself, we have yet to bring and empty bottle back from space and see, however in theory, if the bottle/jar (container) is strong enough it will be filled with negative pressure and create what's called, a vacuum. The bottle will likely contain little to no molecules and you will essentially have a little piece of void space in a bottle.

If the integrity of the bottle is not strong enough to endure the negative pressure. It will simply implode once it's reached its maximum stress level. What this means is that the inside of the bottle is sucking itself so hard that it wants to fold in on itself to balance the pressure pushing on the outside. With this internal pull and external push inward on itself will crush it. The inside of the container is quite literally stretching the very little space inside over the size of the bottle.

This question could also be experimented with different bottle sizes to see if the fraction of atoms are under more stress in a larger container or not?

Finally if your considering a bottle of nothing... We have machines here today, that can create a vacuum in a bottle that are stronger than the vacuum of space and run experiments with it.

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