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I've started learning quantum Mechanics from " Griffiths " book and finished chapter one , but the problem is i feel most of what i'm doing is mathematics , for example he solved the problem of unstable particle by introducing the complex potential energy , when i looked up at the answers here it speaks about things like " Hamilton operator " which i does not know yet , another example he said if you want to find the average of any value remove (P) and put its operator and sandwich the resulting operator between Epsi and its conjugate he even treated the partial derivative squared as a second order derivative he said you will understand how it is like that later , so will the concepts will be bright in later chapter or it is me who to blame ?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by Brandon Enright, Waffle's Crazy Peanut, Wolphram jonny, Kyle Kanos, JamalS Dec 16 '14 at 6:50

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ A very simple book is "Lecture notes on quantum mechanics" by Gordon Baym. He is a very good teacher. $\endgroup$ – Sofia Dec 16 '14 at 3:19
  • $\begingroup$ How can anyone possibly answer the question? Especially at this point when you have not even covered the rest of the book, how can we judge if you will actually learn something? $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Dec 16 '14 at 3:24
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I think it would be better for you to learn more about classical mechanics first. From your question I conclude that the only approach to mechanic you know is Newtonian mechanics. Get a book about analytical mechanics, there you will be introduced to canonical coordinates, Lagrangian mechanics and Hamiltonian mechanics.

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  • $\begingroup$ i think you are true since i only know Newtonian mechanics in the vector form only. $\endgroup$ – Mohamed Osama Dec 16 '14 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ Or, watch the Susskind Lectures available at theoreticalminimum.com $\endgroup$ – K7PEH Dec 16 '14 at 3:35
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Well.. If you want to learn quantum mechanics, I suggest first to learn the "old quantum mechanics". And then you can go to "real" Quantum Mechanics.

I suggest "Fundamentals of Modern Physics" by Robert Martin Eisberg. It will introduce you with all you need to know, before going to Quantum Mechanics of Griffiths.

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  • $\begingroup$ But they say Griffiths book is the book to start Quantum Mechanics and they say it is " very easy " to start with , i've never heard about " old and real quantum Mechanics " . $\endgroup$ – Mohamed Osama Dec 16 '14 at 0:36
  • $\begingroup$ And they are right. It is a good book to start learning quantum mechanics. But before learning quantum mechanics, is often better to first learn modern physics, which includes this old quantum theory I told. And Griffiths is "very easy" to start assuming you already know modern physics. =). $\endgroup$ – Physicist137 Dec 16 '14 at 0:40
  • $\begingroup$ That book mentioned is very old. I used it back in the 1960s. You should find more modern treatments of the subjects. Eisberg never kept that book up to date but he has, with Resnick, written a similar more modern book. Goes into good detail (much more than Griffith's) on the old quantum theory development and also "starter" work with Schrodinger's Equation. But, also it is pricey so I would look around for other similar texts as well. $\endgroup$ – K7PEH Dec 16 '14 at 0:46
  • $\begingroup$ @K7PEH What is the name of this modern book you told? I might read it. $\endgroup$ – Physicist137 Dec 16 '14 at 0:52
  • $\begingroup$ It is "Quantum Physics of Atoms, Molecules, Solids, Nuclei, and Particles" By Robert Eisberg and Robert Resnick. Published by Wiley. I have the edition dated 1974 which I think is the first edition. Another book that covers the same level of material but definitely not as many applications is "Quantum Mechanics, An Accessible Introduction" by Robert Scherrer. Published by Pearson Addison Wesley. The Eisberg book is about 1 1/2 inches thick whereas the Scherrer book is about 1/2 inch thick (not including the hardcovers of either books. $\endgroup$ – K7PEH Dec 16 '14 at 0:57

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